Talking about Texture

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I probably date myself in this post – so read it and share it quickly, before I come to my senses and delete it.

 

My interest in texture began  during the early years publishing an indie-music ‘fanzine’ “(the) Urban Rag.

Clarification needed, I believe. The texture I’m referring to here as two-dimensional would I feel be more accurately be called a ‘pattern,’ whether repeating or random. However I believe over the past 30 years convention has redefined texture in relation to photos and more specifically Photoshop.

Here’s an excellent explanation from a site called SFGATE.

 

“Texture and pattern are terms that describe various decorative elements, such as upholstery fabrics, curtains, walls and even types of tile. While it may be difficult to tell which is which from afar, hands-on access clues you in right away. A pattern is a visual element that repeats, such as plaid or stripes, whereas texture can be felt, such as the surface of a brick or a piece of burlap. … Texture can be seen as well as felt; it has some level of dimension to it.

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The Zine “Urban Rag,” was named through a mashup (before mashups existed) of “Urban Blight,” a band active at the time and who’s set list was hanging from a speaker in my home – and Rag, common derogatory slang for a newspaper. I didn’t know at the time I’d later work for a string of sub-urban newspapers – but I’ll save that for another time

With humble apologies, I admit the website is about as lame and primitive as you’ll ever see – but it is a time-capsule.

The Urban Rag was initially assembled in my pre-Desktop Publishing days meaning there was variably wax, or glue and glue sticks and bits of paper and cut out headlines and printed images – basically the layout was a collage. (Credit due to a contemporary zine called “Crashing Waves.” Who’s ‘digest’ size and general approach I emulated.)

We also used these sheets of transferrable letters that had various fonts and sizes that you rubbed on to the sheet you were creating – sort of high-tech ransom note approach. These rub on letters and symbols are still available, or available again, but I moved away from them as the process grew more computerized.

By the end of the process, the master – from which we made copies for circulation/distribution truly had texture. Parts it were thick with layers, had uneven edges and were made up of different materials. But the end result was flat, two-dimensional and for many years reduced to black and white or shades of grey on colored stock

My partner in this venture, Gary, had access to a copy machine (like so many zine publishers) and the early issues were photocopied in a (church) office after hours. We looked for creative backgrounds on which to layout each page. I’m sure it was he who came up with this first.

We’d take two and three-dimensional items and objects, photocopy them, then layout the reviews on the photocopies.

We used remnants of wrapping paper, seconds of screen from a window, the dimpled lens from a drop ceiling light figure – you name it.

In 2013 ago I posted a series of photos from a bridge construction project. These stand on their own as part of that digital exhibit, but the purpose for many of the photos was to collect textures for use in Photoshop.

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These shots and others are part of my texture bank. They’re on the shelf if and in case I need them for some future photo (or publishing) project or exercise.

Much in the way things change as you look at them more closely – new details emerge, this texture bank offers a wide range of possibilities. In the photo copying days this was achieved through enlarging or reducing what we were copying. Computers have made this a bit easier to be sure – though less ‘organic.’

tex4If you take photos for fun, pleasure (or even profit) and think creative/artistic editing is in your future (with scissors or Photoshop) If you’re not already doing it – I encourage you to begin capturing and collecting these sorts of images for your texture bank – or savings account.

 

~ Jonathan

 

 

 

 

I operate the Ment Media Group. You can subscribe to the photography blog and follow on Twitter

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